Remains from mass grave, battle of Visby. The battle was fought in July 1361 outside Visby, on the Swedish Baltic island of Gotland, between invading Danish troops and the local, Gutnish, forces. The Danish won a decisive victory.
Due to the heat, the dead had to be disposed of quickly, and many were buried in their armour. The archaeological excavation of one of the mass graves, in the 1930s, revealed over 1000 skeletons. In comparison with the later medieval mass grave from the English battle of Towton, the remains from Visby showed more shin injuries and fewer cranial injuries. This suggests that the chainmail coifs, which had gone out of fashion at the time of the battle of Towton (1461), provided relatively good protection, and that greaves were probably not worn.
The osteological analysis suggested that the dead included both juveniles and elderly, indicating that many were not professional soldiers. Others probably were, as suggested by the presence of previously healed injuries.
Some of the remains can be seen in the Gotland museum in Visby.

Remains from mass grave, battle of Visby. The battle was fought in July 1361 outside Visby, on the Swedish Baltic island of Gotland, between invading Danish troops and the local, Gutnish, forces. The Danish won a decisive victory.

Due to the heat, the dead had to be disposed of quickly, and many were buried in their armour. The archaeological excavation of one of the mass graves, in the 1930s, revealed over 1000 skeletons. In comparison with the later medieval mass grave from the English battle of Towton, the remains from Visby showed more shin injuries and fewer cranial injuries. This suggests that the chainmail coifs, which had gone out of fashion at the time of the battle of Towton (1461), provided relatively good protection, and that greaves were probably not worn.

The osteological analysis suggested that the dead included both juveniles and elderly, indicating that many were not professional soldiers. Others probably were, as suggested by the presence of previously healed injuries.

Some of the remains can be seen in the Gotland museum in Visby.

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